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A trip to the car dealership: 3 things you must always do to get the most for your money

As I sit here at the Subaru dealership where I purchase all of my family vehicles, I am reminded that those of us who use and purchase military surplus tents and equipment do so for one reason and one reason only; because we want the best value that our money can bring us.

There’s nothing wrong with being thrifty, that is simply being a good steward of the money that you have been entrusted with, and I am always looking for ways to make my money go further and last longer.

I know from experience that almost any trip to the car dealership is going to cost me $300, and having just spoken to the service technician, (here because of a “check engine” light activation), I learned that today is no exception because the sensor that I need replaced is $260.00 plus tax…

But that’s ok, because as I look around the showroom, I’m finding ways to even out the expenditure. One of the things that I notice immediately is that there is a Coleman tent in the showroom that has the Subaru label emblazoned across the top. The fact of the matter is that I am in the market for a new tent anyway and have been looking for one, (not that I can afford it now after buying a $260 sensor), however, I know that I’m also going to need to buy a new car in the next two years…

So, here then are three things you must do to always try to get the most bang for your buck:

  1. Try to get some freebies added on. Whenever I buy a car, I always look for some freebies to get thrown in to “seal the deal” if you will. The aforementioned tent is a good example. I don’t know of any car dealer who is going to let a $24,000 car deal go down the tubes over a $70 tent. I, on the other hand, will walk right out the door over a $70 tent, or a $250 set of roof racks, ($49.95 at Wal-Mart).
  2. Don’t do the trade-in thing. There is only one reason that dealerships, whatever type they are, take trade-ins. That’s because they are profitable. Why let the dealership get the most out of your valuables? Sell them yourself and get the full dollar amount out of them. It’s not that much trouble and you work too hard for your money to give it to someone else.
  3. Always consider buying use items. I’m not a big fan of buying used cars, just because I like to start off fresh with a factory warranty and know exactly how that thing was maintained all of it’s life. But for everything else I buy used. My cameras, guns, electronics, etc… are always bought used or surplus just because for the most part there are no hidden variables to worry about. What you see is what you get and wear and tear isn’t likely an issue.

 

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